seahawks

Seahawks vs. St Louis Rams: Things to love & hate from Sunday

Playing to their level

The Seattle Seahawks went into St Louis on Sunday looking to make a name for themselves in the NFC West. After starting off the year with a heartbreaking loss at division rival Arizona, the Seahawks couldn’t afford to lose their second division game of the year.

Leave it to the Seahawks, though, and they’ll surprise you in many ways. After looking stellar against power houses Dallas and Green Bay, Seattle marched into St Louis and allowed their kicker to single handedly beat them.

There wasn’t much to love in the loss to the Rams, but I did find one thing. And you bet there was a LOT to hate about this game.

Love ‘em

Marshawn Lynch & Robert Turbin

The only bright spot of the day was the running game, anchored by Marshawn Lynch and complimented by Robert Turbin. With both of their running styles being as similar as they are, it’s no wonder Turbin can step right in and succeed. This Seahawks team has built their offense around the ground attack and it has absolutely worked.

In fact, Marshawn Lynch is currently the NFL leader in rushing through 4 weeks.

Lynch ran the ball 20 times for 118 yards, which is an average of 5.9 yards per rush. Turbin had 6 for 45 yards which comes out to 7.5 yards per carry. The Seahawks look to that production to eat away the clock and tired the other team’s defense. And it worked.

Marshawn Lynch

Marshawn Lynch is currently the NFL leader in rushing through 4 weeks.

These 2 are a perfect combo and despite the ugly losses on our record, these 2 backs are going to keep this team competitive.

Hate ‘em

Play Calling

Whether Pete Carroll is handcuffing Russell Wilson‘s offensive ability or not, what can’t be denied is the fact that the play calling in this game was atrocious.

Why does Darrell Bevell, on 3rd down and 2 to go, call a quarterback option?

Why not go with one of your bruising running backs who are averaging a combined 5.3 yards per carry?

Instead, you call an option where St Louis KNOWS that Wilson won’t throw the ball. They flood the backfield and the play turns into a stupid call on astronomical levels.

This was not the only terrible play call but was, by far, the worst this season. This is just the biggest example out there.

Penalties

The Seahawks has much fewer penalties this week than last week which is always a plus. What hurt them this week, though, was the timing of the penalties they received.

When Seattle was flagged each time, it seemed like it either extended Rams drives to allow them to get into field goal range or it halted their own progress on a drive and moved them back into less manageable positions.

The penalties need to stop, period.

They’re hurting this team.

Interceptions

Russell Wilson threw for 3 interceptions in the game.

Those 3 should not be credited to him at all. I’ve been complaining for a long time that the NFL should change the interception stat to who is to blame on them.

Russell Wilson & Pete Carroll

Russell Wilson threw for 3 interceptions versus the Rams

The interception he threw while being hit in the backfield was a normal football play. Had his linemen done their job, the pass rusher would not have gotten to Wilson and he probably would have completed that pass.

The throw to Doug Baldwin where he essentially gave up on the play and dropped the ball as he was tripping was a terrible interception.

The Seahawks have had some drops issues and this is a sign that it is more prevalent than we thought.

And the game losing interception was just atrocious. I’m hearing people analyze that and say that Wilson could have throw to a wide open Doug Baldwin down the middle instead of Anthony McCoy who slipped and allowed the ball to be picked off.

If you’ve never played football, let me explain this notion to you. For starters, Wilson’s pass was picture perfect. Had McCoy not slipped and fell on his cut during his route, that ball would have been in his chest, in stride, allowing McCoy to pick up extra yardage.

It would have been a first down which is all Seattle wanted to continue running down the clock while moving into scoring position.

Second, though, is the fact that when Wilson threw the ball, Baldwin was covered. Many don’t realize that quarterbacks have mere seconds to make decisions.

He looks at each receiver for a split second and moves on to the next one.

If somebody gets open after the QB has already looked at him or thrown the ball, it’s null and void.

Those picks were not on Russell Wilson.

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About Brandon Choate

Guest reporter on "Real Rob Report." Raised on Eastside of Seattle, a super fan of every sports team in Seattle. Bleeds Blue, Green, Teal, Purple and Gold. Likes video games, food, and poor attempts at comedy. Connect with Brandon today!
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